06 May 2010 ~ 0 Comments

floor’s on fire

floor’s on fire

Simply put: do not sit on problems. Sort them out and do it quickly. If you’re standing watching the floor burn, it’s going to reach you at some point.

In a parallel of the ‘broken windows theory’ , a problem left alone will begin to breed like a disease. People will notice it. They will start to comment and be affected by it. The problem will move to the epicenter of everything else you are aiming to accomplish and, if left long enough, will likely encompass your other goals.

That’s not healthy and it’s completely avoidable. Kill a problem and kill it quick.

Whether it be a misunderstanding, a misrepresentation, a truth that’s distracting or even a person who is agitating and proving chaotic – aim for the heart of the issue and get it resolved.

The people around you will appreciate the quick resolution.

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27 April 2010 ~ 0 Comments

precision

precision

You want something done by someone by sometime. Yeh, let’s go do that. WHAT???

When you need people to do something, be very specific. Set a goal or objective and give it a deadline. Make it quantifiable and something that can be measured.

If there is a destination, people can go on a journey. People will go on a journey. This is ultimately what motivates people to be part of something.

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20 April 2010 ~ 0 Comments

whose?

whose?

Other people are great at creating or being a problem. In fact, they’re the best. You see it every day.

What if, hypothetically, you took one of those problems (pick any one) and looked at it as you causing this problem?

Now it’s your fault. What would you do to fix it?

Do that with every problem. In the future you can look back at how much you have fixed.

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17 March 2010 ~ 0 Comments

stuff i learned at sxsw 2010

stuff i learned at sxsw 2010

I attended the 2010 South by Southwest Interactive conference in Austin Texas for the first time over the past few days. After attending countless panels, discussions, presentations and workshops I left feeling like I’ve read twenty books in two days.

It incredibly difficult to describe exactly what attending SXSW feels like. If you’ve ever been to the Grand Canyon and then tried to explain the immensity of what you saw to someone who has never been there… same thing but with technology and being surrounded by successful, insightful and determined people.

While I took tens of pages of notes, here’s the headlines of what I learned and picked up from the people I spent time with in Austin.

approach

  • social media is not about you
  • everyone who is doing something progressive and useful is using an Apple iPhone and MacBook Pro (this is not an advert)
  • allow and facilitate visible backchannel chat
  • great, clean-looking speakers speaking clearly telling stories win
  • a sales pitch switches everyone off. the crowd goes cold and walks
  • genuine appreciation is impossible to fake. people are unwittingly sensitive to a bullshitter
  • social media and e-commerce are not connected. they are different answers to different problems
  • if you’re breaking a rule, know why you’re breaking it
  • people and context first, only then do whatever you were going to do first
  • prototype: make a commercial, not a specification (Google doesn’t use specifications anymore)

people

  • in real life famous people and millionaires are human beings and exactly like you
  • the successful people are not doing anything you can’t already read in a non-fiction book and apply yourself (so why aren’t you?)
  • everyone is reachable and you should reach them
  • if a famous person doesn’t give you much attention it’s because you’re not interesting. expect the same from non-famous people.
  • if you’re not presenting, you’re a critic. you just are
  • online everyone is famous and everyone with a camera phone is in media
  • nobody cares about your products except for you

experience

  • the least important part of a technology is the technology
  • press releases are corporate generated spam and serve no lasting purpose. connect with your customers every day instead
  • internal communication and communities must be stronger than your external communication
  • when handling complaints avoid treating the customer like an ex-girlfriend instead of a future girlfriend
  • hug a customer today
  • people ask the internet first (nobody asks advertisers where the world is going)
  • ship experiences people love
  • take a non-linear experience into a linear experience = use cases/examples
  • if you have to sneak around in your company to help your customers you have a catastrophic problem
  • make it included, never free
  • people who buy from you want you to succeed

I have collected all the people that made these words into a Twitter list: http://twitter.com/bnlv/sxsw-2010

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